Understanding and informing consumers about their electricity use

Time:
12:00 - 13:00
Speaker:
Vedran Lesic
Location:
Mechanical Engineering Building, Room - 131

Policy makers are increasingly encouraging households to save electricity, so as to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and improve the reliability of the electricity grid. However, such encouragements may be ineffective if consumers are unaware of how much electricity is used by different appliances.

Leeds University Business School based researcher Dr Vedran Lesic talks about his work to help to enhance the uptake of new and novel systems and technologies for improving resource and energy efficiency in the EU process industries.

For further information, please contact Steven Hawkins at s.d.hawkins@leeds.ac.uk

About the speaker

Vedran Lesic

Vedran is working on the European Commission’s project SPRING with the primary aim to enhance the uptake of new and novel systems and technologies for improving resource and energy efficiency in the EU process industries. He is working on the project to redesign and improve the way metrics about impact and innovation are being measured together with Dr Richard Hodgett and Professor Alan Pearman.

He recently completed his doctoral degree on topic of “Understanding and Informing Consumers’ About Their Electricity Use”. He was a recipient of University of Leeds 110 Anniversary Research Scholarship and worked within the Consumer Data Research Centre and the Centre for Decision Research under the supervision of Professor Wändi Bruin de Bruin, Dr Matthew Davis, Professor Inês Lima Azevedo and with special advisory from Dr Tamar Krishnamurti. The team incorporated methods from behavioural decision research, psychology, user experience research, engineering and public policy. Vedran has participated in several international conferences and events.

Find out more about his GESA research here

Abstract

Policy makers are increasingly encouraging households to save electricity, so as to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and improve the reliability of the electricity grid. However, such encouragements may be ineffective if consumers are unaware of how much electricity is used by different appliances. We therefore examined the difference between consumers’ perceived and actual residential electricity use for specific appliances. Consumers were recruited from Texas households with appliance-specific electricity meters. We measured their electricity use for a set of appliances, over the course of three summer months. Participants were randomly assigned to assess their appliance-specific electricity use in terms of dollars or kilowatt-hours, for an average summer month. Consistent with previous studies (e.g. Attari et al., 2010), participants overestimated the energy consumed by their low energy consuming devices and slightly underestimated that of their most energy-consuming device - their air conditioning condensing units. Thus, while responses were inaccurate relative to actual consumption, participants correctly perceived the variation in energy consumption between these devices. Results also showed that responses between the experimental groups estimating their consumption in kWh and dollars are similar, the accuracy of the two groups’ perceptions were similar, and levels of confidence in between the two groups were similar.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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