John Hayes

Emeritus Professor

Email:
jh@lubs.leeds.ac.uk
Categories:
Academic, Management
Profile

Qualifications

PhD
BSc, Economics
MIPD (Member, Institute of Personnel and Development)
AFBPsS, (Associate Fellow of the British Psychological Society)
Chartered Occupational Psychologist.

Membership of Professional Bodies
British Psychological Society
Chartered Institute of Personnel & Development

Experience

2014 to date: Emeritus Professor of Change Management, University of Leeds
1990-2014: Professor of Management Studies, University of Leeds

1982-1989: Senior Lecturer and Deputy Head, Department of Management Studies, University of Leeds

1980-1981: Reader in Organisational Behaviour and acting head of the OB group, School of Industrial and Business Studies, University of Warwick

1979-1996: Visiting Fellow, Centre for the Study of Organisational Change and Development, University of Bath

1968-1980: Lecturer, Department of Management Studies, University of Leeds

1966-1968: Assistant Lecturer, Department of Management Studies, University of Leeds

1965-1966: Research Assistant, Department of Psychology, University of Leeds.

Managing partner, John Hayes and Associates.

In parallel with my academic career, I have pursued an active career as a management consultant working with individuals and teams to help facilitate change in complex organisational settings.  I have worked for a wide range of private sector companies, including Six Swiss Exchange (Zurich Stock Exchange), KU, iQuest, GNER, National Australia Group, Yorkshire Bank, British Gas, BT, ICI, Lucas, Delphi, BP, Occidental Petroleum, Bawden Drilling, Glaxo, Reckitt and Coleman (pharmaceuticals), DLApiper, Buro Happold, Ladbrokes and Nestle.  I have also worked for a range of public sector organisations such as the American Army, RAF, Benefits Agency, NHS, and NACRO.

Research

Vocational development. Early research (supported by the SSRC and the Gulbenkian Foundation) was in the field of vocational development.  The research produced a critique of the pre 1960’s approach to vocational guidance and contributed to the development of a new paradigm to aid professionals involved in the facilitation of vocational development and occupational choice.  Before the 1960’s vocational guidance tended to be offered as a specialist advisory service that carefully matched the talents and interests of school leavers against what was known about the work tasks and skill requirements associated with specific occupations.  My work, with Peter Daws and Barrie Hopson helped to research and disseminate a new paradigm.  This recognised the developmental nature of vocational choice and involved an extended pre-leaving educational process to help pupils deliberate about their future roles in society and choose occupations on the basis of self-knowledge and an understanding of the psycho-social as well as the economic aspects of occupations.  It involved injecting a sense of agency and encouraging individuals to take greater responsibility for shaping their own lives.  It also involved helping individuals develop skills to help them manage their own vocational development long after leaving school.

Processes of change in organisations.  Research on vocational development led to an interest in how change affected individuals (preparation for the books on Transition and The Psychological Effects of Unemployment) but the underlying theme of later work emerged as the development and implementation of change strategies in  organisations.  Research on training as a strategy for change was supported over the period 1975-79 by the Petroleum Industry Training Board, 1981-82 by British Telecom and 1982-84 and 1987-89 by the Overseas Development Agency and the British Council.  Research on managers’ beliefs regarding the controllability of outcomes in organisations and how these might be changed was undertaken with assistance from British Gas.

The universality of HRM theory and practice across different cultural settings.  The British Council funded a number of study visits to management training institutions across India which led to two collaborative projects with the faculty of the Institute of Management in Government at Trivandrum.  These looked at the factors inhibiting the transfer of learning and the effect of culture on the efficacy of different modes of consultation.  A development of this work was a series of studies, funded by the British Council, into the ways managers from different cultures went about learning and mastering the tasks which confront them.  This led onto my collaborative work with Professor Chris Allinson.

Human information processing. Since 1986 Professors Hayes and Allinson have worked on a rolling programme of research into learning/cognitive styles.  Particular interests are their interaction with educational and work environments on outcomes such as performance, morale, leader member exchange and mentor-protégé relations, and correlations with variables such as national culture and entrepreneurship. A major feature has been the development  of a measure, the Cognitive Style Index, which has been used in most of our recent studies and adopted by many others in research related to our own.

Teaching

Leeds University Business School: Change Management, EMBA
Aarhus School of Business: Implementing Change, Executive MBA
Copenhagen Business School:  Change Management, EMBA
USI Lugano (Switzerland) with Singapore Management University: Change Management, MSCom

Responsibilities

No management responsibilities within LUBS

Publications

Books

Hayes, J (2014) The Theory and Practice of Change Management (4th edition), Basinstoke: Palgrave.

Allinson, C.W. and Hayes, J. (2012) The Cognitive Style index: Technical manual and user guide.

Hayes, J. (2010, 2007 and 2002) The Theory and Practice of Change Management, Basinstoke: Palgrave.

Hayes, J. (2002) Interpersonal Skills at Work, 2nd edition, London: Routledge.

Hayes, J. (1996) Developing the Manager as a Helper, London, Routledge, pp. 161

Hayes, J. (1991) Interpersonal Skills: Goal Directed Behaviour at Work, London, Routledge, pp263.

Hayes, J. and Nutman, P. (1983) Comprendre Les Chômeurs, Bruxelles: Pierre Mardaga, pp.221. (Translated by T Monacelli and C Quoirin.)

Hayes, J. and Hopson, B. (1982) La Orientación Vocational en la Ensenanza Media, Barcelona, Oikos~Tau, pp.243. (Translated by Josep Rovira.)

Hayes, J. and Nutman, P. (1981) Understanding the Unemployed: The Psychological Effects of Unemployment, London: Tavistock, pp.167.

Adams, J., Hayes, J. and Hopson, B. (1977) Transition: Understanding and Managing Personal Change, London: Martin Roberston, pp. 247

Hayes, J. (1971) Occupational Perceptions and Occupational Information, Institute of Careers Officers, pp66.

Hayes, J. and Hopson, B. (1971) Careers Guidance, London: Heinemann, pp.260.

Hopson, B and Hayes , J (1968) The Theory and Practice of Vocational Guidance, Oxford: Pergamon, pp. 523

Book Chapters

Hayes, J. (2001) Interpersonal Skills, In Malcolm Warner (ed.) International Encyclopedia of Business and Management, 2nd Edition, Vol.8, pp. 3465-69, London: Thomson Business Press.

Hayes, J. (1998) Interpersonal Skills. In Michael Poole and Malcolm Warner, The Handbook of Human Resource Management, London: Thompson Business Press, pp. 160-164.

Hayes, J. and Allinson, C. W. (1995) Cultural differences in the learning styles of managers, in T. Jackson (ed.), Cross Cultural Management, Oxford, Butterworth Heinemann, pp. 373-379.

Cromie, S. and Hayes, J. (1991 )The pre-entrepreneurial careers of aspiring business proprietors, In R. Donckels aand A. Meittesum, (eds) New Entrepreneurship: Findngs and Perspectives, Gower.

Hayes, J. and Dunn A. (1989) A diagnostic approach to improving managers' operational effectiveness. In Roger Bennett and John Peters (eds) Insights in to Human Resources Management, Bradford, MCB University Press, pp. 87-91.

Hayes, J. (1981) Over forties in professional, managerial and administrative work, In C.L. Cooper, and D. Torrington, (eds.) After 40: The Time for Achievement, London, Wiley.

Journal articles

Armstrong, S. J., Allinson, C. W. and Hayes, J., (2004) The effects of cognitive style on research supervision: A study of student-supervisor dyads in management education, Academy of Management Learning and Education. Vol. 3, No. 1, pp. 41-63

Hayes, J., Allinson, C. W. and Armstrong, S. (2004) Intuition, women managers and gendered stereotypes, Personnel Review, Vol. 33, No. 3, pp. 403-417

Armstrong, S. J., Allinson, C. W. and Hayes, J. (2002) Formal mentoring systems: An examination of the effects of mentor/protégé cognitive styles on the mentoring process, Journal of Management Studies, Vol. 39, No. 8, pp. 1111-1137.

Hayes, J., Allinson, C.W., Hudson, R.S. and Keasey, K. (2003), Further reflections on the nature of intuition-analysis and the construct validity of the Cognitive Style Index, Journal of Occupational and Organizational Psychology, Vol 76, No. 2, pp. 269-278.

Armstrong, S. J., Allinson, C. W. & Hayes, J. (2002) Formal mentoring systems: An examination of the effects of mentor/protégé cognitive styles on the mentoring process, Journal of Management Studies, Vol. 39, No. 8, pp. 1111-1137.

Allinson, C. W., Armstrong, S. J. and Hayes, J. (2001) The effects of cognitive style on leader-member exchange: A study of manager-subordinate dyads, Journal of Occupational and Organizational Psychology, Vol. 74, pp. 201-220.

Sadler-Smith, E., Allinson, C. W. and Hayes, J. (2000) Learning preferences and cognitive style: some implications for continuing professional development, Management Learning, Vol. 31, No. 2, pp. 239-256.

Allinson, C. W., Chell, E. and Hayes, J. (2000) Intuition and entrepreneurial performance, European Journal of Work and Organizational Psychology, Vol. 9, No. 1, pp. 31-43.

Hayes, J., Rose-Quirie, A. and Allinson, C. W.(2000) Senior managers’ perceptions of the competencies they require for effective performance: implications for training and development, Personnel Review, Vol. 29, No. 1, pp. 92-105.

Allinson, C. W. and Hayes, J.(2000) Cross-national differences in cognitive style: implications for management, International Journal of Human Resource Management, Vol. 11, No. 1, pp. 161-170.

Hayes, J. and Allinson, C. W. (1998) Cognitive style and the theory and practice of individual and collective learning in organisations, Human Relations, Vol. 51, No.7, pp. 847-871.

Hayes, J. and Allinson, C. W. (1997) Learning styles and training and development in work settings: lessons from educational research, Educational Psychology, Vol. 17, Nos. 1 and 2, pp. 185-193.

Armstrong, S., Allinson, C. W. and Hayes, J. (1997) The implications of cognitive style for the management of student-supervisor relationships, Educational Psychology, Vol. 17, Vols. 1 and 2, pp. 209-217.

Hayes, J. and Allinson, C.W. (1996) Helping others to help themselves: the key to effective staff development, Journal of the Fire Service College, Vol.3, No.2, pp.109-115.

Hayes, J. and Allinson, C. W. (1996) The implications of learning styles for training and development: a discussion of the matching hypothesis, British Journal of Management, Vol. 7, pp. 63-73.

Allinson, C. W. and Hayes, J. (1996) The Cognitive Style Index: a measure of intuition-analysis for organisational research, Journal of Management Studies, Vol. 33, pp. 119-135.

Pant, D., Allinson, C. W. and Hayes, J. (1996) Transferring the western model of project organisation to a bureaucratic culture: the case of Nepal, International Journal of Project Management, Vol. 14, No. 1, pp. 53-57.

Allinson, C. W., Hayes, J. and Davis, A. (1994) Matching the cognitive styles of management students and teachers: a preliminary study, Perceptual and Motor Skills, Vol. 79, pp. 125 - 128.

Hayes, J. and Allinson, C. W. (1994) Cognitive style and its relevance for management practice, British Journal of Management, Vol. 5, pp. 53 - 71.

Hayes, J. and Allinson, C. W. (1993) Matching learning style and instructional strategy: an application of the person-environment interaction paradigm, Perceptual and Motor Skills, Vol. 76, pp. 63 - 79.

Hayes, J. (1993) The role of the business school in management development, Personnel Review, Vol.22, No.1, pp.4-17.

Hayes, J. (1991) Expectations regarding the controllability of outcomes in organisations: Implications for organisation development, Journal of Change Management, Vol 4, No.1, pp.48-63.

(Hayes, J., Expectations regarding the controllability of outcomes in organisations: implications for management and organisation development. Reproduced in Management Decision, 1992, Vol. 30, No.6, pp156-165).

Cromie, S. and Hayes, J. (1991) Business Ownership as a means of overcoming job dissatisfaction, Personnel Review, Vol. 20, No.1, pp. 19-24.

Allinson, C. W. and Hayes, J. (1990) Validity of the Learning Styles Questionnaire, Psychological Reports, Vol. 67, No. 3, pp. 859 - 866.

Hayes, J. and Pulparampil, J. (1989) Trainers' perceptions of the factors which influence the transfer of learning: An Indian case study. International Journal of Public Sector Management, Vol. 2, No, 1, pp. 35-43.

Hayes, J. and Prakasam, R, (1989) Culture and the efficacy of different modes of consultation, Leadership and Organization Development Journal, Vol. 10, No. 1, pp. 24-32.

Allinson, C. W. and Hayes, J. (1988) The Learning Styles Questionnaire: an alternative to Kolb's Inventory? Journal of Management Studies Vol. 25, No. 3, pp 269 - 281.

Hayes, J. and Allinson, C. W.(1988) Cultural differences in the learning styles of managers, Management International Review, Vol. 28, No. 3, pp 75 - 80.

Cromie, S. and Hayes, J. (1988) Towards a typology of female entrepreneurs, The Sociological Review, Vol. 36, No. 1, pp.87-113.

Hayes, J. (1987) The project-based MBA: A new approach to management education, Management, (Kenya) February, pp 4-5.

Hayes, J. and Vant, J.H.B. (1984) Better training in the workplace, Training Officer, Vol. 20, No. 1, pp. 296-298.

Hayes, J. (1984) The politically competent manager, Journal of General Management, Vol. 10, No. 1, pp. 24-33.

(Hayes, J., The politically competent manager, Reproduced in the Pakistan Management Review, 1985, Vol. XXVI, No. 3, pp. 33-41)

Butterworth, J. and Hayes, J. (1984) A decade of developing management development, State Enterprise (India) June, pp. 21-26.

Hayes, J. and Butterworth, B. (1984) Achieving organisational change through project-based training: a cross cultural experiment, Personnel Review, Vol. 13, No. 3, pp. 22-28.

Hayes, J. and Dunn, A. (1983) Is training really the answer? A diagnostic approach to improving organizational effectiveness, Journal of European Training, Vol.7, No. 1, pp10-14.

Hayes, J. (1982) Changing the organisation and society as strategies for ameliorating the effects of unemployment, Personnel Review, Vol.11, No.4, pp. 31-35.

Hayes, J. (1982) Changing the individual as a strategy for ameliorating the effects of employment, Personnel Review, Vol. 11, No. 2, pp. 26-32.

Hayes, J. and Vant, J.H.B. (1981) Critical stages in the development and implementation of training strategies, Management Education and Development, Vol.12, No. 1, pp. 42-53.

Hayes, J. (1976) Organisation development: A group centred approach to improving the effectiveness of after-care hostels, British Journal of Social Work, Vol.6, No.4, pp.465-480.

Hayes, J. and Hough, P. (1974) Perception of other work roles: Implications for job change, Journal of Management Studies, Vol.11, No.2, pp.143-148.

Hayes, J. (1973) Occupational perceptions and the psychological aspects of work, Journal of Occupational Psychology, Vol.47, pp. 121-129.

Watson, P., Hough, P. and Hayes, J. (1973) Career success: A new perspective, British Journal of Guidance and Counselling, Vol.1, No.2, pp.66-79.

Mangham, I., Hayes, J. and Cooper, C. (1970) Developing executive relationships, Interpersonal Development, Vol.1, No.2, pp.110-127.

Hayes, J. (1970) The home and the school in the process of vocational development, Careers Quarterly, Vol. XII, pp.28-33.

Hayes, J. (1969) Theories of occupational choice: A framework for vocational guidance, Youth Employment, Spring, pp.13-18.

Hayes, J. (1969) A new look at occupations, Guidelines, pp. 13-19.

Hayes, J. (1969) Occupational choice and the perception of occupational roles, Journal of Occupational Psychology, Vol.43, pp. 15-22.

Hayes, J. (1969) National manpower needs and the vocational guidance counsellor, Vocational Aspects of Education, Vol. XXI, pp.79-82.

(Hayes, J., National manpower needs and the vocational guidance counsellor, Reproduced in the Careers Bulletin, Research Supplement No.1, 1970).

Hayes, J. and Hopson, B. (1969) Occupational information and the problems of vocational development, Technical Education Abstracts, Vol.9, No.1, pp. 6-9.

Hayes, J. (1967) The role of occupational information in careers guidance, Educational Research,Vol.9, No.3, pp.191-196.

Hayes, J. (1964) Incomes Policy: Mirage or Reality, Accountant, Vol. CL, No 4665, pp. 614-615.

Reports

Butterworth, J. and Hayes, J. (1987) Public Enterprise Training: Trainer Development, London: Technical Education and Training Operations and Consultancies Group, British Council, pp.26.

Hayes, J and Vant, J.H.B. (1981) Offshore Rig Management, Petroleum Industry Training Board, pp.7.

Hayes, J and Vant, J.H.B. (1979) Development of Offshore Management and Supervisory Skills, Petroleum Industry Training Board, pp.18.

Conference papers

Armstrong, S. J., Allinson, C. W. and Hayes, J., Cognitive style and mentor-protégé relationships, Academy of Management Conference, Chicago, USA, August 1999.

Allinson, C. W., Chell, E. and Hayes, J., Intuition and entrepreneurial behaviour: an exploratory study, Proceedings of the European Learning Style Information Network Conference, University of Central Lancashire, 1999.

Allinson, C. W., Chell, E. and Hayes, J., Intuition and entrepreneurial behaviour: an exploratory study, European Learning Style Information Network Conference, University of Central Lancashire, July 1999.

Allinson, C. W. and Hayes, J., Formal mentoring systems: an empirical study of the effects of mentor-protégé cognitive styles on interpersonal relationships, International Work Psychology Conference, University of Sheffield, July 1998.

Hayes, J. and Allinson, C. W., Cognitive style and organisational learning, European Learning Style Information Network conference, University of Sunderland, July 1998.

Allinson, C. W., Armstrong, S. J. and Hayes, J., The effects of cognitive style on leader-member exchange relationships: do they matter?, Academy of Management Conference, San Diego, USA, August 1998.

Hayes, J. and Allinson, C. W., Intuition, women managers and gendered stereotypes, European Learning Style Information Network Conference, University of Birmingham, July 1997.

Allinson, C. W. and Hayes, J., Cross-national differences in cognitive style: implications for management. In Proceedings of the British Academy of Management Conference, University of Aston, 1996.

Hayes, J. and Allinson, C. W., Cognitive style and learning at the level of the individual and the organisation, Proceedings of the British Academy of Management Conference, University of Aston, 1996.

Hayes, J. and Allinson, C. W., Cognitive style and the theory and practice of individual and collective learning in organizations: a conceptual synthesis, Symposium on Organizational Learning and the Learning Organization: Theoretical and Research Developments, University of Lancaster, September 1996.

Hayes, J. and Allinson, C. W., The business of style management and the management of learning in organizations. Learning Style Conference, University of Birmingham, April 1996.

Allinson, C. W. and Hayes, J., Understanding organisational behaviour through cognitive styles. Paper presented at the Management Skills Training Conference, the University of Liverpool, March 1995.

Hayes, J. and Allinson, C. W., Learning style and international human resource development. Paper presented at the fourth meeting of the International Conference of Human Resource Management, Brisbane, Australia, July 1994.

Hayes, J. and Allinson, C. W., Learning styles: implications of the matching hypothesis for training and development. In Proceedings of the British Academy of Management Conference (refereed papers track), 1994, Lancaster, University of Lancaster, 1994, pp. 99 - 110.

Read more about: